A 1989 Vanwagon for your amusement

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teamtestbot
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Vehicle: 1989 Mitsubishi Van/Wagon
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Re: A 1989 Vanwagon for your amusement

Postby teamtestbot » Sun Sep 15, 2013 6:59 pm

Sorry, probably meant to reply but it fell off my mental to-do list! I'm in Cambridge.

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teamtestbot
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Vehicle: 1989 Mitsubishi Van/Wagon
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Re: A 1989 Vanwagon for your amusement

Postby teamtestbot » Sat Oct 26, 2013 4:54 pm

Hi everyone,

It's been a while! Since my last posting, the van has been up and down Mt. Washington in New Hampshire:

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I received a new hatch glass and repaired the rust underneath it:

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Starting the process of removing the paint and filler under that area.

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The rain channels were seemingly patched very hastily with riveted steel patches, which were not sealed (the rivet holes were open) so presumably the corrosion began again very quickly. I cut them out and replaced these with several layers of fiberglass cloth.

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I made a not-concerted effort to match the surrounding body contour. The filler was only to smooth the area around the patches; else I was not going to restore the ~1.5-2mm of filler thickness that the previous repair used to recontour the hatch. I'm not a fan of large swaths of Bondo.

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Several layers of primer, then several layers of Chrysler Bright White (the closest white I found at Autozone) to the select area. After that, a few clearcoat layers.

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You can tell the new from old and feel the mismatched contour, but I'm way more interested in preservation and making sure the rust doesn't return. The window was reinstalled professionally lest I accidentally dropped it or something.

Since the fixup, I've been to New York City and back twice, and once to Burlington, VT. It's currently 700 miles from 160K, which meant somehow between the end of May and now I've logged almost 9000 miles! Mostly in the form of long roadtrips.

I've been trying to track down the source of a suspension creak which has been getting steadily worse over the past few months. Based on how it creaks I think it has something to do with the front sway bar - it only creaks 'differentially' if one wheel hits a bump and the other doesn't. May be time for some new bushings...

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teamtestbot
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Re: A 1989 Vanwagon for your amusement

Postby teamtestbot » Wed Nov 20, 2013 4:54 pm

Hi everyone,

I think the first major mechanical modification I want to perform is a limited-slip differential. Reading back through this thread, I see a few maybe-possibly candidates. Has anyone ever done an LSD swap? Any known compatible part vehicles? The current rear axle is the stock 4.22:1.

minimotos95
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Location: colorado USA

Re: A 1989 Vanwagon for your amusement

Postby minimotos95 » Wed Nov 20, 2013 5:19 pm

here's some useful info if we have the same rear end as a MM/D50 http://www.mightyram50.net/phpbb3/viewt ... f=92&t=343 i have both a 2wd 4 cylinder MM and a 87 wagon outside, so i will go check out the outside of the diffs tomorrow to see if i can find any external differences and let you know
i was researching the same thing a few months ago and couldn't find much, it sucks that there's almost no online community for our vans so it's hard to know these things unless you've done them.

EDIT: i couldn't find any external dimension differences between a 1991 mighty max pumpkin and my 87 base wagon's, but i was only able to measure accurately up to 6" the rest i used a tape measure for, so if it's also the same internally too you can do anything you could with a mighty max. i hope this helps.
1987 US wagon base model g64b

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teamtestbot
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Re: A 1989 Vanwagon for your amusement

Postby teamtestbot » Fri Nov 22, 2013 10:30 pm

It looks like same-gen Monteros and later year Starions are the way to go for easy swaps, then? Anyone else have some data points?

yojimbo
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Re: A 1989 Vanwagon for your amusement

Postby yojimbo » Sat Nov 23, 2013 8:18 am

While doing all that door work you should have let in some drains like later doors have, which stop exactly that rust problem.
1994 L300 Jasper
1986 Scimitar 1.8Ti

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teamtestbot
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Re: A 1989 Vanwagon for your amusement

Postby teamtestbot » Tue Nov 26, 2013 11:32 pm

On my bucket list of things to slowly improve is the very underdamped ride. Right now I can totally do this.



(Not as bad as that, but it's bouncy.)

Any preferred brands and types of dampers? I'm looking at some KYB shocks on Rock Auto, but can't find any good objective reviews to appraise them by.

yojimbo
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Re: A 1989 Vanwagon for your amusement

Postby yojimbo » Wed Nov 27, 2013 11:47 am

Kyb are the current oem fitment if you buy from mitsu I believe. I have some on mine (possibly not the exact same model) they made a big difference and seem to have lasted ok.
1994 L300 Jasper
1986 Scimitar 1.8Ti

Yokohama
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Re: A 1989 Vanwagon for your amusement

Postby Yokohama » Fri Nov 29, 2013 11:02 am

teamtestbot wrote:Hi everyone,

I think the first major mechanical modification I want to perform is a limited-slip differential. Reading back through this thread, I see a few maybe-possibly candidates. Has anyone ever done an LSD swap? Any known compatible part vehicles? The current rear axle is the stock 4.22:1.


The L300 uses the what is called an 8 inch differential. Also, the Starion/Conquest differential will not fit both case wise, and in terms of the internals.

What you do to LSD swap depends on what gearing you want. The LSD's had low gearing, so if that is good, then you just swap out the center carrier and leave in the axle (see FSM). But, if you have to take the LSD from one, and combine it with the R&P (ring and pinion) from another, then you have to take it apart according the correct procedure and reassemble it and set it up correctly. If the differential is not set up correctly, then you will damage the unit. Read the FSM details, but you may want to consider having a drive train shop do that part and then do the install of it into the van yourself.
The best MPG gearing is the 3.54 from certain Might Max's/D50's. Very hard to find. Most of them were 3.9:1.

It is a choice between LSD and a locker. I understand that there are some high quality lockers for this differential. In terms of new, a locker is much more cost effective than a LSD, but you only use the locker for things like off-road, etc.

The issue will be that most of the factory lockers came in the 9.5 inch differential.
mitsubishi-factory-rear-air-locker-7409.html

I did hear once that some guy said that the LSD in the van did not seem to drive well, but that could just have been his impressions.
Whenever On-Road and off-road; on duty and off duty, it is DELICA Moment. -CMC

"Practical vehicle fitting wide occasion from personal use to commercial use.
Many can ride / many can be loaded." -Official Mitsubishi L300 product website

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teamtestbot
Posts: 93
Joined: Mon Apr 29, 2013 7:48 pm
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Vehicle: 1989 Mitsubishi Van/Wagon
Location: MA, USA

Re: A 1989 Vanwagon for your amusement

Postby teamtestbot » Fri Nov 29, 2013 12:19 pm

Ah, I was waiting for you, since you posted way back early in the thread about it. Thanks! I don't mind trading ring gears and carriers, so long as I know which ones are compatible. I'm still getting the impression that I should be hunting for same-era Monteros.

More interested in a limited-slip than a locker, since it's highly unlikely this thing will ever see intentional heavy off-roading, and the road conditions here during winter tend to be slush and snow.

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Re: A 1989 Vanwagon for your amusement

Postby Yokohama » Tue Dec 10, 2013 11:28 am

Yes, you will want to hunt for the 83-89 4-cyl, or the 89-91 6-cyl Montero.

You could also see if you can get a LSD rear from a Canadian L300 and have it shipped to you, as I
understand they are also 8 inch (4WD version rear)
Whenever On-Road and off-road; on duty and off duty, it is DELICA Moment. -CMC

"Practical vehicle fitting wide occasion from personal use to commercial use.
Many can ride / many can be loaded." -Official Mitsubishi L300 product website

Yokohama
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Re: A 1989 Vanwagon for your amusement

Postby Yokohama » Thu Dec 19, 2013 10:12 am

You van's front is probably sagging and not at factory height.

You will want to re-index and adjust your torsion bars, then get an alignment. There are several guide that have been linked below on how to do this, but here are some notes on the USA spec van that do not seem to be mentioned in other guide for the JDM versions.

Jack up the van as high as you can get it. Use "V" headed jack stands on the front round tube cross-member under where they
bolt to the frame (as specified).
For the USA spec L300, you will need to at least loosen the back of the fuel tank, and then lower the front of it. Be sure to lower only as much as you need to gain some room. Do this when the tank is low if possible. A section of wood and a scissor jack are good to lower and support the front of the tank. The alternative, and in this situation, probably desirable is to drop the tank and restore it with new interior coating. POR 15, makes a tank sealant kit that I used. I will do a small write-up on how to do this later, or ask if you need help sooner.

After the tank is lower/dropped, you can then remove the front tank mount. You will notice that it has three bolts; one on the outer side and two on the inner side of the mount. They are 14mm short bolts with washers. If you do not drop the tank, you may need to use a swivel joint and some extensions to reach the outer bolt. Do this by going on the outer side of the tank. You will need a good spot light to be able to see up to the bolt. The other two inner bolts can be reached by a short socket and a standard ratchet. You will kind of reach over the inner side of the tank and be able to push up enough to get them loose.
When you have that removed follow the re-index procedure.

About the re-index procedure; do not make the "special tool" with the modified deep socket, it is not needed, but a deep socket is helpful to tighten up the adjustment nut when adjusting after re-index. You WILL need two 17mm closed end ratchet wrenches. They do not have to be the expensive ones.
1. To get the DRIVER'S SIDE torsion bar adjuster lock nut loose, you can use one of the wrenches, and a standard length breaker bar to use as a pry bar. Just position the wrench so that you can use the transmission end to seat the end of the bar against, and be able to move the wrench that is on the lock nut. BE SURE that you don't contact the electrical connectors that are mounted on the transmission side. Once you have it loose, you will not need the pry bar.
2. Passenger's side: Easier, but you do have to contend with the exhaust (catalytic converter). Just use the pry bar technique and find a spot on the frame where you can pry.

3. When you have re-indexed, reinstall the tank mount. Put some grease on the body contact area of the mount for anti-corrosion purposes. Then install mount and bolts. Be sure to tighten them to a firm level. Torquing them is not necessary, as long as they are firm.

4. After the tank mount it in, but before tank is put back in position/installed, re-index and then do initial measuring and setting. The re-index guide details this.

Other notes: You can pull back on the torsion bar rear mounts when they are loose, they will slide off with no effort. Be sure to pull back just enough to be able to more past on spline, and then do one more. The guide is correct, 2 is the limit. The passenger's side (USA spec) adjustment rod will have just enough thread to get the bolt back on. For the initial set, set both side the same, and be sure to reinstall the lock nuts too. Use the open end of one of the ratchets to hold the adjustment nut from moving while using the closed ratcheting end of the other one to tighten the lock nut. Be sure to make sure that all the rear and front tank bolts are tight.

Once the re-index is done, drive it for 20 miles, and then fill up the tank and follow the adjustment procedure (adjust bars when tank is full to account for load). Make sure that you have only the normal weight in the van (factory spec weight distribution).
RE-INDEX:
re-indexing-torsion-bars-for-front-lift-4051.html
(also here: l300-torsion-bar-reindexing-6206.html)

ADJUSTMENT (they spec 45mm, but follow your FSM):
http://www.mdocuk.co.uk/forums/viewtopic.php?t=19608
Whenever On-Road and off-road; on duty and off duty, it is DELICA Moment. -CMC

"Practical vehicle fitting wide occasion from personal use to commercial use.
Many can ride / many can be loaded." -Official Mitsubishi L300 product website

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teamtestbot
Posts: 93
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Vehicle: 1989 Mitsubishi Van/Wagon
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Re: A 1989 Vanwagon for your amusement

Postby teamtestbot » Sat Dec 21, 2013 2:16 pm

Hah, it is definitely (very slightly) lower on the driver's side front. However the over disposition doesn't look bad. I've thought about adjusting the torsion bars, but have not yet done so.

Yokohama
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Re: A 1989 Vanwagon for your amusement

Postby Yokohama » Sun Dec 22, 2013 9:08 am

If set to the correct height, you also improve the handling. Leveling it back up stiffens the suspension back up. After re-index/adjustment I noticed it was definitely much better.

When adjusting, once you get close to the correct measurement, you will need to make 1/8-1/2 or so, turn adjustments of the nut, and then drive it for a few minutes over some bumps and ruts to get the suspension to settle. Then recheck and make further adjustments.
For the fine adjustments especially, you have to do a measure, adjust, drive, measure, adjust, drive...

That said, www.discountmitsubishiparts.com sells them for less than a $100 a side! I will be getting new ones in the future.
Whenever On-Road and off-road; on duty and off duty, it is DELICA Moment. -CMC

"Practical vehicle fitting wide occasion from personal use to commercial use.
Many can ride / many can be loaded." -Official Mitsubishi L300 product website

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teamtestbot
Posts: 93
Joined: Mon Apr 29, 2013 7:48 pm
Member's Photo Album: http://www.delica.ca/Photos/
Vehicle: 1989 Mitsubishi Van/Wagon
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Re: A 1989 Vanwagon for your amusement

Postby teamtestbot » Thu Dec 26, 2013 11:29 pm

A lot of ongoing facilities improvements have been happeing. First, I actually replaced all 4 shocks absorbers:

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Rears were easy.

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I got some time on the student automotive teams' lift to do the fronts, since it was far easier this way than on jackstands. KYB all-around, with Moog links. The ride is much less 'battleship-like'.

Does anyone have bushing torque recommendations? I feel like the ones given in the service manual results in a rather loose ride, but do not know if you can "overtighten" the bushings.

More tacky bodywork was done to head off damage at the rear left side:

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That's underbody anti-rust paint on the inside of the repair, and a few coats each of primer, color, and clear on the outside. I did not use any body filler compound to try and make up for the "original" lines. The whole left side is pretty beat up anyhow from previous owners.

I finally found out what was making a persistent rattle in the exhaust ever since it began running again.

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Yup, it was a chunk of oxygen sensor! That was replaced with a new unit, but I had to do some fabrication and repair on the extremely rusted exhaust flanges to put it back together again, like drilling new studs:

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Before getting this all together, I drove to the shop with straight exhaust. Highly illegal, but hilarious.

I replaced the cheesy front speakers with something more sufferable:

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This was done without tearing apart the dashboard using information found in http://www.delica.ca/forum/front-speaker-removal-4839.html. However I did have to remove the bracket to the left first... couldn't fit a socket in any other way. This caused the process to take 2+ hours. The speakers used were Pioneer TS-D1002.

The center subwoofer speaker was empty when I found it, and also did not output voltage at the amplifier. I added a new driver (same type as left and right), and also found that whoever wired it beforehand did not connect the external amplifier enable line (There's a little relay inside the amp board that turns the whole thing on and off).

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I used an oscilloscope to probe where the signal path was going, but it didn't take long to find that they just stopped at the amp chip which had no voltage being fed to it. I just hotwired the amp power to 12v:

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Scope confirms the amplifier's output is working. I figured 1980s japanese electronics don't just mysteriously fail.

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The speaker replacement has added tons to the experience, especially with a functional center channel. I'd say it's now mid-2000s economy car class. Nothing phenomenal.


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